Perdido Key, FL – Lost Key Golf Club has been recognized for continued sustainable management of natural resources. Originally designed by Arnold Palmer Golf Designs, Lost Key was the first course in the world to become certified through the Audubon International Silver Signature Program. Certified on July 29, 1998, Lost Key has been recertified by Audubon International and is celebrating its seventeenth year as a Certified Signature Sanctuary.

Located on Florida’s northwest coast near the Alabama state line, the 287-acre property is situated on Perdido Key in Escambia County. The Gulf of Mexico is within one half mile of property’s southernmost point. 

“The general course layout originally was designed to utilize upland areas as much as possible in order to avoid and minimize wetland impacts,” stated Nancy Richardson, Signature Program Director, during the recertification site visit to Lost Key.

Natural wetland areas were expanded by 5.4 acres by backfilling excavated upland areas with existing wetland muck, thus preserving the site-specific gene pool. Lost Key Golf Club is one of the few areas of protected wilderness in the Florida panhandle, and has faced significant inundation and damage from hurricanes. But the plant community, a mixture of North Florida flatwoods, sand scrub, and North Florida coastal strand, has survived and flourished. Wildlife corridors wind through sand live oak, sand pine, and slash pine, and support pairs of nesting osprey and American bald eagle, alligator, deer, and healthy shore bird populations.

To become recertified, Signature Program members must demonstrate their continued commitment to the Principles for Sustainable Resource Management as outlined in their site-specific Natural Resource Management Plan. This plan addresses wildlife conservation and habitat enhancement, water quality monitoring and management, integrated pest management, water conservation, energy efficiency, waste reduction and management, and the adoption of green building products and procedures.

Following the site review, Ramsey Prescott, golf course superintendent, said: “At Lost Key Golf Club, we agree in a co-existence of both humans and nature, and believe that the best way to sustain that co-existence is by developing and maintaining our property with best management practices.  By working with Audubon International through their Signature Program,  we are able to implement effective cultural practices, follow with proper water management techniques,  and develop sound fertility programs while protecting the environment and preserving the natural heritage of the game of golf.”

“At Lost Key Golf Club, we agree in a co-existence of both humans and nature, and believe that the best way to sustain that co-existence is by developing and maintaining our property with best management practices. By working with Audubon International through their Signature Program,  we are able to implement effective cultural practices, follow with proper water management techniques,  and develop sound fertility programs while protecting the environment and preserving the natural heritage of the game of golf.”

To learn more about Lost Key Golf Club, go to www.lostkey.com.

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